The Paris city passes in comparison: which pass should you buy?

A city pass can bring you many advantages when exploring Paris. With it, you can save time, you won’t have to worry over individual tickets and can spend less time in waiting lines, and you can of course also save some money. Our Paris expert, Meike, will tell you about the different Paris passes here.

When you’re exploring the attractions of Paris, you can save money and time with a Paris pass.

But choosing the right city pass for Paris really isn’t so easy.

In Paris, there are a total of four different passes for visitors that cover different services.

So something like the one best pass doesn’t exist. Depending on where your interests lie and what kind of traveler you are, either one or the other pass will be better suited for you.

In this article you’ll find all the info you’ll need to decide which pass works best for you.

Planing a trip to Paris? There more useful articles that will help you plan your trip.

To all my Paris articles

My recommendation for those in a rush: this is the best Paris city pass

In this article, I’ll describe in detail each Paris pass and be sure to show you the advantages and disadvantages that go along with each pass.

But if that’s too much for you, you can get a short and sweet look here at which passes are, in my opinion, most worthwhile.

#1 The best Paris pass if you’d like to see as many attractions as possible in at least 3 days

Best choice: the Paris City Pass

This pass is ideal if you’re taking a trip to Paris for at least 3 days and would like to see as much as possible. There are over 60 museums and attractions within the Paris City Pass, and it also includes public transportation so that you can get directly from one attraction to the next.

Besides this, you have priority entrance to the Louvre, Centre Pompidou, Arc de Triomphe and Musée d’Orsay, which is definitely an advantage at such busy museums.

And for the ultimate Paris feel, a boat ride on the Seine is also included.

To the Paris City Pass

#2 The best Paris pass if you want to see as many attractions as possible in 2 days

Best choice: the Paris Museum Pass

The least expensive of all the passes. If you’re only in Paris for 2 days, the Paris Museum Pass is rather worth it. It works just like the Paris City Pass, only that public transportation and the boat ride on the Seine are not included.

A day ticket for the bus and metro costs 7.50 euros though, so you’ll still save money in comparison to the Paris City Pass. And as for the boat ride, if your focus is on museums and attractions, you wouldn’t have enough time in two days to do it anyway.

To the Paris museum pass

#3 The best Paris pass if you only want to visit a few attractions

Best choice: buy individual tickets

If you’d only like to visit the Eiffel Tower and a few other museums or sights, a pass isn’t worth it.

With a day ticket for 7.50 euros, you can inexpensively tour around the whole city using public transportation.

For the attractions that you would like to visit though, you should still buy your individual tickets beforehand online if possible. That way you’ll save a lot of time from standing in line.

Is a Paris city pass even worth it?

Buying a pass has various benefits, but it’s still not worth it for every Paris visitor.

An important advantage of three of the four passes is that they already include the ticket for public transportation, so they’re an all around worry-free package.

Besides that, as a holder of a Paris pass, you gain priority entrance to a lot of museums and sights, through which you can save a ton of time on weekends or in the summer.

The entrance area of many attractions is divided between visitors without tickets, visitors with single tickets, and visitors who are in possession of a Paris pass.

It’s practically impossible to use all of the offers covered in the passes, there are just too many. But because the entrance fees to the sights and museums in Paris are relatively expensive, a pass is often also financially worth it.

The entrance for the Eiffel Tower is unfortunately not included in any of the passes. Any way you slice it, you’ll unfortunately still need a separate ticket for the Eiffel Tower.

If you’re younger than 26 years old, a pass is generally not worth it for you. A lot of Paris museums and attractions are free for under-18s and under-26s with a European ID.

Also, all visitors with a disabled person ID card and their companion usually receive free entrance. In case you belong to one of these groups, the Paris passes are all unnecessary for you.

The choice of the optimal Paris pass

When choosing the right pass, you should first think about what you’d like to see and do, and then see which pass fits best to your plans.

My tip: Don’t pack your day too full. You should give yourself at least two to four hours per attraction, and don’t forget that in between you also have to eat something.

Some of the included offers can be planned well for the evening. For example, the Montparnasse Tower and the Arc de Triomphe are open until late, and a boat ride on the Seine is also much more beautiful in the dark than during the day.

Also, some of the museums are open once a week until 9 or 10 pm, and you can visit the Centre Pompidou every day until 9 pm. So you don’t have to have everything done by 6 pm.

For those in a hurry: a quick overview of the passes

For a quick, first overview, I’ve made a compact summary of the passes and their services for you here in a table.

Further on, I’ll describe each individual pass briefly.

 Paris City PassParis Museum PassParis PasslibParis Pass
Variant2,3,4,5,6 days2,4, or 6 days2,3 or 5 days2,3,4 or 6 days
Included Attraction60+60+60+60+
Price109€ - 209€57€ - 83€119€ - 165€130€ - 235€
To the passTo the passTo the passTo the pass

Paris City Pass (Turbopass)

My personal favorite

Paris City Pass

My personal favorite is the Paris City Pass because it’s really extensive and also includes
different guided tours, for example through Montmartre, the Opéra Garnier or the football stadium Stade de France.

In total, around 60 attractions and museums are included in this pass, you get priority entrance to the Louvre, Musée d’Orsay and Centre Pompidou, can use public transportation and can take a boat ride on the Seine.

The Hop-On-Hop-Off-Bus is not included, and because of that, the Turbopass, which is 110 euros for two days, is cheaper than the Passlib’ or the Paris pass. The pass can be for two, three, four, five or six consecutive days.

Buy the Paris City Pass

Paris Museum Pass

The cheapest: for lovers of art and culture or short stays

Paris Museum Pass

This pass is valid for over 60 attractions and museums, including the Palace of Versailles. It starts from 57 euros for two, four or six consecutive days.

It doesn’t include any travel with public transportation or other offers, so it’s the cheapest of all the passes. However, for a surcharge you can also book a boat tour with it.

If you’d like to visit a lot of attractions and museums, then the museum pass is a good choice. With this pass, you’ll receive priority entrance at many places and avoid long waits in line.

In combination with a day ticket for public transportation for 7.50 euros, you can cost-effectively see a lot with this pass.

Buy the Paris Museum Pass

Paris Passlib’

The convenient one: for a diverse and worry-free program

Paris PasslibThe Paris Passlib’ is the extension of the museum pass. It includes all the offerings of the museum pass, plus a one hour boat ride on the Seine, a day on the Hop-On-Hop-Off-Bus and public transportation.

The pass can be for two, three or five days, and starts at 109 euros. You’ll also get priority entrance at many places with this pass.

The savings with this pass are usually not really high, but you’ll be totally provided for during a short stay.

Buy the Paris Passlib’

Paris Pass

The comprehensive one: when you want to see as much as possible

Paris Pass

The Paris Pass is the most comprehensive of the passes. It includes over 60 museums and attractions, public transportation, a boat ride on the Seine, the Hop-On-Hop-Off-Bus, the wax figure museum “Musée Grévin,” the Montparnasse Tower and a wine tasting.

It can be for two, three, four or six consecutive days and starts from 139 euros. With this pass, you’ll also have priority entrance at many places.

Because this pass is the most expensive, it’s only suitable if you’re particularly ambitious and on the go from morning until night in order to see as much as possible of Paris.

Buy the Paris Pass

How do the passes work?

As in many other cities, the passes in Paris are offered extra for tourists. You pay a flat rate value, for example for three days, and then you can use all of the pass’s included offers during these three days.

All passes are valid for a specific amount of time, for example three or five days. When booking the pass, you don’t have to specify your start day for the pass yet.

Your pass will first be activated when you use it for the first time, be it at the entrance of a museum or on a ride with the metro. From this day on, your pass will be valid for your chosen period of time.

This period of time unfortunately can’t be interrupted. A pass for three days that you activate on Tuesday is good for Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.

The days of use are considered as calendar days, not in 24 hour blocks. If you use your pass for the first time at 5 pm, this day is also counted as your first day. By doing this you’d lose a lot of time, so take care to activate your pass during the morning if possible.

When booking a pass you’ll receive a voucher with which you’ll later collect your chosen pass in Paris. Unfortunately, up till now it still isn’t possible to print the pass directly or save it to your phone.

Important: you have to show identification when picking up your Paris pass, so be sure to bring along your personal ID.

It’s more convenient if you have the pass sent to your house by mail. That works really well, for example, with the Paris City Pass. There are indeed shipping costs, but it’s definitely more convenient.

#1 Paris City Pass (Turbopass)

The Paris City Pass, from the German pass provider Turbopass, is my personal favorite.

What does the Paris City Pass offer you?

The Paris City Pass offers an all around worry-free package for your stay in Paris:

  • Entrance to over 60 museums and attractions
  • Public transportation on all valid days of the pass
  • Boat ride on the Seine
  • Film screening of “Paris Story”
  • Visit to wine cellar with wine tasting
  • Fly View Paris (a virtual flight above Paris)
  • Various guided sightseeing tours of the city (often only English)

Attention: the guided tours don’t occur daily, so if you’d like to participate in one or more of the tours, be sure to take a look at when they take place while planning your trip. For some tours, you have to register on the website at least 24 hours in advance.

Included in the offerings are, for example, the following tours:

  • City tour “Street art & flea market”
  • City tour “Art Nouveau”
  • Guided tour: Opéra Garnier
  • Guided tour: artists’ quarter Montmartre with visit to Sacre Coeur Basilica
  • Guided tour: football stadium Stade de France

How much does the Paris City Pass cost?

The Paris City Pass can be valid for various lengths of time. The longer the pass is valid for, the lower the price per day.

In the following table you’ll find an overview of the prices:

Advantages of the Paris City Pass

  • Over 60 museums and attractions included
  • Public transportation included
  • Extensive offers
  • In some cases priority entrance
  • Various guided tours

Disadvantages of the Paris City Pass

The only real disadvantage of the city pass is that it doesn’t cover the Hop-On-Hop-Off-Bus. If you don’t have to use the buses anyway, then it’s not that bad.

My conclusion on the Paris city pass

The biggest advantage of this pass is, in my opinion, the tours offered with it. Don’t expect a dry history lesson, but instead a relaxed tour in sociable company.

Some of the tour guides also speak German, but not all. All speak English though, so you don’t have to worry about your knowledge of French at all.

When using the pass for two days, you won’t notice too much of a price advantage. Even so, the Paris City Pass is a convenient one, and even for two days it’s affordable and an all around worry-free package.

If you have a stay for three days or longer, and you’re diligently on the go, you’ll quickly save money and time with the Paris City Pass.

Get the Paris City Pass here

#2 Paris Museum Pass

The Paris museum pass is purely an entrance ticket for attractions, without additional services like the metro or boat rides.

So, this pass is by far the cheapest and also offers, like all the other passes, the advantage that you can avoid some of the lines.

Even though the name suggests it, the Paris Museum Pass doesn’t exclusively include museums, but also many other historical attractions.

If you’d like to organize your stay in Paris for as inexpensively as possible and would like to dedicate it to art and culture, then the Paris Museum Pass is right for you.

What does the Paris Museum Pass offer you?

The Paris museum pass includes entrance to over 60 museums and attractions, for example:

  • Musée du Louvre
  • Arc de Triomphe
  • Musée de l’Armée and Les Invalides
  • Centre Pompidou
  • Musée du quai Branly
  • Conciergerie
  • Musée d’Orsay
  • Panthéon
  • Musée Rodin
  • Sainte-Chapelle

How much does the Paris Museum Pass cost?

The museum pass can be valid for 2, 4 or 6 days. You can find the prices in the following table:

Advantages of the Paris Museum Pass

  • Cheaper price
  • Over 60 museums and attractions included
  • In some cases priority entrance

Disadvantages of the Paris Museum Pass

  • Public transportation is not included
  • No further services included

My conclusion on the Paris Museum Pass

The Paris Museum Pass becomes quickly worth it if you visit two attractions per day, even if it’s just for a two-day stay.

I’d suggest that for a four day trip, you buy a pass for two days. That way, on the days that the pass is valid, you can concentrate on the included offers, and then on both of the other days you’ll still have plenty of time for shopping, wine and the Eiffel Tower.

By doing it this way, you can really take advantage of the pass.

If you’re spending six days in Paris, then the Paris Museum Pass is even more worth it. Even if you only visit one or two attractions a day, you’ve already saved money.

Get the Paris Museum Pass here

#3 Paris Passlib’

The Passlib’ includes the same museums and attractions as the Paris Museum Pass, plus some further offers and benefits.

What does the Paris Passlib’ offer you?

  • All offers of the Paris Museum Pass
  • Public transportation in Paris on all valid days of the pass
  • Boat ride on the Seine
  • 1 day Hop-On-Hop-Off-Bus
  • City map
  • Informational brochure about the included offers

How much does the Paris Passlib’ cost?

The Passlib’ can have a length of 2, 3 or 5 valid days. The 2 and 3 day passes include a museum pass for 2 days, and the 5 day pass includes a museum pass for 4 days.

You can find the prices in the following table:

Advantages of the Paris Passlib’

  • Over 60 museums and attractions included
  • Public transportation included
  • Broad range of offers
  • In some cases priority entrance

Disadvantage of the Paris Passlib’

  • Relatively expensive
  • No guided tours included

My conclusion on the Paris Passlib’

Because the pass already includes your ticket for public transportation, it’s a convenient, all around carefree option. Together with the boat ride and the Hop-On-Hop-Off-Bus, it also offers some variety.

The savings with this pass are rather slight, so I suggest it mainly if convenience is important to you. If you use the Hop-On-Hop-Off-Bus, which is relatively expensive to buy on its own, the pass is certainly a bit more worth it.

Another tip: A tour with the open roof, double decker bus is decidedly nicer in good weather than during rain or snow storms. If you sit in the lower level of the bus during rain, you’ll unfortunately see only half as much.

Get the Paris Passlib’ here

#4 Paris Pass

The Paris Pass is basically the next step up from the Museum Pass and the Passlib’ and provides yet more offers. It’s the pass for the ambitious ones who can’t get enough of Paris.

What does the Paris Pass offer you?

  • All the offers of the Paris Museum Pass
  • Public transportation in Paris on all valid days of the pass
  • Boat ride on the Seine
  • 1 day Hop-On-Hop-Off-Bus
  • 1 Wine tasting
  • Visit up the Montparnasse Tower
  • Visit to wax figure museum Musée Grévin
  • Guidebook with city map

How much does the Paris Pass cost?

You can get the Paris Pass for 2, 3, 4 and 6 days. The 3 day pass includes a museum pass for 2 days, while the other passes each include the museum pass for the entire length of validity.

You can find the prices for the pass in this table:

Advantages of the Paris Pass

  • Over 60 museums and attractions included
  • Public transportation included
  • Very extensive and varied offer
  • In some cases priority entrance

Disadvantages of the Paris Pass

  • Relatively expensive
  • No guided tours included

My conclusion on the Paris Pass

I personally find this pass way too extensive for two days. To make it worth it for just two days, you really have to rush from one offer to the next.

If you’re only in Paris for two days and at some point would like to visit the Eiffel Tower, which isn’t included in the pass, then you really won’t have enough time to make use of the pass.

But with a four or six day visit in Paris, things look a little different. If you’d like to see particularly a lot from the city, this pass provides you with a ton of possibilities during a longer stay, but without letting it get too stressful.

Overall, in most cases the Paris city pass is more worthwhile, as it’s slightly cheaper than the Paris pass and is really similar in scope.

Get the Paris Pass here

The differences of the Paris passes at a glance

You now know about each of the different passes in detail. So that you can directly compare the passes with each other, here you’ll find a compact look at the offers included in each pass and how they all differ.

These differences lie exclusively in the included offers. Apart from that, all of the passes work the same way.

Even though the passes essentially include the same offers, such as the Louvre, Arc de Triomphe and Musée d’Orsay, at a closer look they actually differ quite a lot from each other in their content.

You can see exactly where these differences exist in this table:

 Paris City PassParis City PassParis Museum PassParis PasslibParis Pass
Sights
Eiffel TowerNoNoNoNo
Arc de TriompheYesYesYesYes
Tour MontparnasseNoNoNoYes
Sainte ChapelleYesYesYesYes
Palace of VersaillesYesYesYesYes
Opera GarnierYesNoNoYes
Museums
LouvreYesYesYesYes
Centre PompidouYesYesYesYes
Musee d'OrsayYesYesYesYes
Bus, train and boat
Public TransportationYesNoYesYes
Hop-on-Hop-off-BusNoNoYesYes
Seine-Boat TourYesNoYesYes
Special Offers
Stade de FranceYesNoNoYes
Wine TastingYesNoNoYes
City ToursYesNoNoYes
To the passTo the passTo the passTo the pass

My tip: Make a list of the museums, sights and activities that you definitely want to have on your itinerary in Paris. Then compare your list with the table to see which pass includes all your favorites.

Which pass works best for whom?

Unfortunately you can’t give a general answer to this question, because everyone has their own idea of the perfect Paris trip. So, I identified two motivations that might have led you to consider searching for a Paris pass:

  1. You’d like to save money
  2. You’d like to treat yourself to a worry-free, total package

Motivation #1: Saving money

If you’d like to make your Paris visit less expensive through buying a pass, the Paris Museum Pass, Paris Passlib’ or the Paris City Pass could all be an option for you.

By far the cheapest pass is the Paris Museum Pass. If you’d simply like to save money with your pass while you discover the art and culture of Paris, then it’s perfect for you.

Here’s an example: what do you have to visit in two days to make the Paris museum pass worth it?

  • Louvre (19 euros)
  • Arc de Triomphe (12 euros)
  • Musée d’Orsay (14 euros)
  • Centre Pompidou (15 euros)
  • Total price individually: 60 euros
  • Paris museum pass for 2 days: 53 euros

As you can see, you’ll save a few euros with the museum pass. The savings are definitely not huge, but you’ll also save time that is otherwise spent standing in line.

If you want to see more than two attractions or museums per day, the financial savings will become even greater. But then it’d also be really a relatively stressful itinerary.

Get the the Paris Museum Pass here

Motivation #2: The worry-free complete package

You don’t want to worry about your metro tickets any more than you do about the outrageously long wait lines?

Then you should immediately rule out the museum pass, because besides entrance to the included museums and attractions, it doesn’t provide any further services.

The other three passes are all still candidates for you though, so you have the agony of choice. All three already include your ticket for public transportation and a boat ride on the Seine.

Here’s an example for four days with a Paris City Pass for 4 days:

  • Four days riding metro (30 euros)
  • Day 1: city tour (20 euros) + Arc de Triomphe (12 euros)
  • Day 2: Centre Pompidou (14 euros) + Musée Grévin (24.50 euros)
  • Day 3: Opéra Garnier (17 euros) + wine tasting (32 euros)
  • Day 4: Louvre (19 euros) + boat ride on the Seine (15 euros)
  • Total price individually: 185.50 euros
  • Paris city pass for 4 days: 159.90 euros

With this example itinerary, you’d actually save more than 25 euros in comparison to buying separate tickets.

Get the Paris City Pass here

Paris without a city pass

A Paris pass doesn’t have to be a given, you can visit everything just as well with individual tickets! It just depends on how many ticketed attractions you’d like to visit.

But because Paris is a well visited city and there are often long wait lines for museums and attractions, I definitely suggest that you order tickets online.

That way you’ll get in right away without waiting and no valuable time is wasted at the entrance. In this table I’ve given you another overview of how much the Paris attractions cost:

 Price per personTickets
Sights
Eiffel Towerfrom 34 eurosBook here
Arc de Triomphe12 eurosBook here
Palace of Versaillesfrom 20 eurosBook here
Tour Montparnasse18 eurosBook here
Sainte Chapelle10 eurosBook here
Opéra Garnier12 eurosBook here
Museums
Louvre20 eurosBook here
Musée d'Orsay17 eurosBook here
Centre Pompidou14 eurosBook here
Musée Picasso14 eurosBook here
Activities
Boat tour on the Seine15 eurosBook here
Hop-On/Hop-Off-Busfrom 34 eurosBook here
Wine Tasting59 eurosBook here
City Toursfrom 12 eurosBook here

My conclusion

So that the passes are worthwhile, you should concentrate on the included offers on the days that the pass is valid.

Because the Eiffel Tower isn’t included in any of the passes, you should plan your visit there for another day.

I personally find the Paris Museum Pass and the Paris City Pass the best. Which one you choose in the end depends most of all upon what exactly you’d like to do and where your priorities lie.

If you’d rather wander through the streets of Paris and want to visit the well-known attractions and museum less, then I’d do without a pass.

Common questions

To conclude, here are a few answers to some frequently asked questions about the Paris passes.

Are there discounted passes for children and youth?

Yes, partly, but they’re completely redundant. A lot of the museums and attractions are free for all under 18 years old and all under 26 years old with a European ID card or passport.

If you’re under 26 years old, a pass isn’t worth it for you.

How does my pass get to me?

While booking online, you only receive a voucher or sales receipt, which you then have to exchange for your pass on site at the respective sales office. Don’t forget: you have to be able to provide proof of ID as the holder of your pass!

Alternatively, if you book far enough in advance, you can have the pass sent to your house. But this does incur a shipping fee.

Are the passes cheaper on site in Paris?

No, the prices are the same online as on site.

Is the Eiffel Tower included in any of the passes?

No, the Eiffel Tower is not included in any of the passes. I’ve written down all the info on visiting the Eiffel Tower here: Eiffel Tower visit: tickets and tips.

Is a visit to Disneyland included in any of the passes?

No, Disneyland is not included in any of the passes.

Now you should be well informed and have all the info about the best Paris city pass. Do you still have questions or have you already had experiences with one of the passes yourself? Then we look forward to your comments.